What Can Cause Facial Paralysis?

Facial Paralysis Phoenix, AZ

Facial paralysis can result from a range of causes. It is important to identify the cause as soon as possible to allow for the most effective and efficient treatment. Of course, it is also important not to self-diagnose but to instead visit a professional. However, understanding the common causes can help you have a better understanding of facial paralysis in general. 

The common causes of facial paralysis

Several of the most notable causes of facial paralysis include Bell’s palsy, medical procedures, facial trauma, Moebius syndrome, viruses, and tumors. There are many other causes as well, so visiting a professional anytime facial paralysis develops is strongly recommended. 

Bell’s palsy

Bell’s palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Bell’s palsy leads to one side of the face becoming numb and feeling paralyzed. This condition often resolves itself without any medical intervention within six months. However, for more severe cases, therapy or medication may be necessary to resolve the concern. There are many causes of Bell’s palsy, ranging from an infection to a reaction from pregnancy. 

Medical procedures

Some medical procedures and medications can lead to facial paralysis. Most notably, some medical procedures such as facelifts can contribute to or cause facial paralysis. Other procedures that could potentially lead to facial paralysis include mastoid surgery, skull block surgery, and certain dental procedures. Generally, facial paralysis that results from a medical procedure is caused by nerve damage and can be temporary or permanent.  

Facial trauma

Facial trauma can lead to facial paralysis as well. Specifically, any trauma that damages or fractures the temporal bone can lead to facial paralysis. Trauma could be the result of a blow to the face, a physical altercation, a nasty fall, etc. 

Congenital facial palsy

Congenital facial palsy refers to facial paralysis that occurs at birth. Although somewhat rare, some may be born with a condition that causes facial paralysis. Of course, this is not the cause for anyone who has recently developed facial paralysis. 

Moebius syndrome

Moebius syndrome is an example of a condition that causes facial paralysis at birth. It is relatively rare and affects the facial nerves that control eye movement. In some cases, Moebius syndrome can affect the ability to speak, chew, and swallow. 

Viruses

There are certain viruses that can cause temporary facial paralysis, such as mononucleosis, ear infections, and AIDS. This issue typically resolves itself on its own as the patient recovers from the virus within six months. 

Tumors

There are certain tumor types that can cause facial paralysis. It can be either temporary or a more prolonged form of the condition, which would result in aggressive treatment form a neurosurgeon. 

Learn more about the causes of and treatment for facial paralysis

Facial paralysis is not only a concerning symptom in itself, but it could be a sign of a serious underlying condition as well. If you experience facial paralysis, then we encourage you to reach out to our team to schedule a visit. We understand how stressful this symptom can seem, and we are here to help you get the diagnosis and care you need.

Request an appointment here: https://arizonaneurosurgeon.com or call Randall Porter, M.D. at (602) 603-8951 for an appointment in our Phoenix office.

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