How Serious Is an Acoustic Neuroma

Acoustic Neuroma Phoenix, AZ

As it is, acoustic neuroma should not be fatal. This non-cancerous and slow-growing tumor develops in the vestibular nerve from the inner ear to the brain. It usually develops from the Schwann cells that cover the main nerve and grows slowly or sometimes, not at all. However, on the rare occasion that the tumor grows and becomes large enough to press against the brain, it will interfere with a person’s vital functions.

The growth of the acoustic neuroma

Acoustic neuroma grows at an average of 1.5 millimeters per year. Many studies also suggest that these tumors can show little or no growth at all for 10 years. When the acoustic neuroma does not grow, there is no reason for the patient to panic and have it removed. Doctors would suggest monitoring the growth of the tumor.

On rare occasions, an acoustic neuroma can grow rapidly. Often, this growth is without reason. There are no dietary or environmental factors found to affect the growth of an acoustic neuroma. When the tumor does grow, the doctors will suggest invasive or non-invasive procedures or therapies.

The only reason for the growth of an acoustic neuroma is the failure of the “governor” gene to suppress the growth of the Schwann cells. These cells coat the fibers with insulation that slow down the growth of the tumor. If the gene fails, the cells will most likely increase. Sometimes, this can trigger the neuroma to double in size within six months to a year.

What happens when the acoustic neuroma grows?

Most acoustic neuromas are not dangerous or fatal because, as non-cancerous cells, they do not invade and destroy tissues. However, the cells can still cause discomfort and some conditions on the patients if they go through a period of rapid growth. The acoustic neuroma can push against the surrounding structures and affect the movement of the facial muscles. If the tumor gets larger, it can also affect swallowing, eye movement, and speaking.

Early and advanced symptoms of acoustic neuroma

But even with smaller tumors, an acoustic neuroma can still cause hearing loss and balance function problems. In fact, impaired hearing is one of the early symptoms of acoustic neuroma. People usually confuse this symptom with other disorders, not knowing that it could be a cause of acoustic neuroma. Other early symptoms are as follows:

  • Ringing or buzzing in the ear
  • Difficulties with balance
  • Facial numbness
  • A feeling of fullness in the affected ear

While other disorders can also cause these early symptoms, patients should consult doctors when they experience one or more of these symptoms. Patients should not wait for more advanced symptoms to start to appear. Among the many advanced symptoms of acoustic neuroma are headache, facial twitches, and double vision. Difficulty in swallowing and pain in the face are also considered advanced symptoms.

Consult with a doctor

Despite being benign, you should not neglect the symptoms of acoustic neuroma. It can still be fatal when left untreated because, although rare, the possibility of it growing is still there. Doctors will suggest regular tests to observe the growth of the tumor. This way, you can choose to remove it surgically or via radiation therapy once it starts to grow.

Get more information here: https://arizonaneurosurgeon.com or call Randall Porter, M.D. at (602) 603-8951

Check out what others are saying about our services on Yelp: Acoustic Neuroma in Phoenix, AZ.

Recent Posts

What Is An Acoustic Neuroma?

An acoustic neuroma is a medical term referring to a condition in the brain. Typically, a neurosurgeon or neurologist will be the point of contact when managing or treating this condition, as they are both skilled with all things relating to the brain. A neurosurgeon would be responsible for the treatment of an acoustic neuroma,…

Pediatric Neurosurgery To Treat Hydrocephalus

Looking for information on pediatric neurosurgery for children with hydrocephalus? Read on to learn more about this type of treatment. Hydrocephalus is a brain condition that almost always requires neurosurgery. When this condition affects a pediatric patient, it is especially concerning because the build-up of fluid creates an immense amount of pressure on the brain.…

Spinal Tumor Treatment Options

When it comes to treating spinal tumor, a neurosurgeon will need to know the type of spinal tumor, as well as the stage of the tumor. Vertebral column tumors, intradural-extramedullary tumors and intramedullary tumors are three common types of spinal tumors that people can be diagnosed with.Want to understand more about a spinal tumor? According…

Treatment For Facial Paralysis

Facial paralysis does not always require treatment. Sometimes, doctors will recommend continuous monitoring of the condition. For example, facial paralysis caused by Bell’s Palsy will usually go away in six months. The treatments designed to treat this condition depend on the patient’s age, the cause of the paralysis, the severity of the paralysis, and the…

Recent Posts

What Is An Acoustic Neuroma?

What Is An Acoustic Neuroma?

An acoustic neuroma is a medical term referring to a condition in the brain. Typically, a neurosurgeon or neurologist will be the point of contact when managing or treating this condition, as they are both skilled with all things relating to the brain. A neurosurgeon would be responsible for the treatment of an acoustic neuroma,…

Pediatric Neurosurgery To Treat Hydrocephalus

Pediatric Neurosurgery To Treat Hydrocephalus

Looking for information on pediatric neurosurgery for children with hydrocephalus? Read on to learn more about this type of treatment. Hydrocephalus is a brain condition that almost always requires neurosurgery. When this condition affects a pediatric patient, it is especially concerning because the build-up of fluid creates an immense amount of pressure on the brain.…